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Phone: 202-994-6460
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E-mail: gwmedia@gwu.edu

 

GW Law to Host Senator Elizabeth Warren

“Five Years On, Learning Lehman's Lessons from the Panic of 2008: Are We Better Prepared for the Next Financial Crisis?”

MEDIA CONTACTS: Angela Olson
202-994-3087; olsona@gwu.edu
Nicole Carlotto
202-994-6466; nfcarlotto@gwu.edu

EVENT:    

GW Law School’s Center for Law, Economics & Finance (C-LEAF) and Better Markets will host Senator Elizabeth Warren and a panel of experts to discuss the lessons learned from Lehman Brothers' collapse, Wall Street's unprecedented lobbying campaign against new regulations mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act to make our financial markets stronger and further steps that are needed to protect Main Street and U.S. taxpayers from Wall Street's risk-taking and the potential threat of additional government bailouts.  

WHEN:    

Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013; 8:30 a.m. — Noon

WHERE:    

The George Washington University Law School
The Jacob Burns Moot Court Room
2000 H St., NW, Washington, DC
Foggy Bottom-GWU Metro (Orange and Blue lines)

R.S.V.P.:      

Media interested in attending should contact Liz Field at 202-994-5609 or efield@law.gwu.edu or Angela Olson at 202-994-3087 or olsona@gwu.edu.

SCHEDULE:     

9 a.m.–12 p.m.: Keynote and Panel Discussion

Keynote Address:  Senator Elizabeth Warren

Panel Discussion
•    Neil Barofsky, adjunct professor of law, NYU Law School; former inspector general for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP); and author of “Bailout: An Inside Account of How Washington Abandoned Main Street While Rescuing Wall Street”

•    John Coffee, Adolf A. Berle professor of law, Columbia Law School;  director, Columbia Law School’s Center on Corporate Governance

•    Jamie Galbraith, professor of government, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas;  author, “Inequality and Instability: A Study of the World Economy Just Before the Great Crisis”

•    Ted Kaufman, visiting professor, Duke University Law School; former senator; former chair of the Congressional Oversight Committee for T.A.R.P.

Moderator
Jennifer Taub, associate professor of law, Vermont Law School; author, “Other People's Houses: How Decades of Bailouts, Captive Regulators, and Toxic Bankers Made Home Mortgages a Thrilling Business”

Closing Remarks
William D. Cohan, Vanity Fair contributing editor, Bloomberg View columnist and author, “Money and Power: How Goldman Sachs Came to Rule the World;” “House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and Wretched Excess on Wall Street” and “The Last Tycoons: The Secret History of Lazard Frères & Co.”

BACKGROUND:

In mid-September 2008, Lehman Brothers, the fourth-largest investment bank in the world, declared bankruptcy. The ensuing financial panic led to the worst crisis in the financial markets since 1929, nearly bringing down the entire U.S. financial system before massive government bailouts rescued the banks and the entire global financial system. Five years later, Main Street still lacks adequate safeguards against Wall Street's culture of aggressive risk-taking.

About GW Law
GW Law, long recognized as one of the top law schools in the country, pursues a distinctive research and learning mission that engages the leading law and policy questions of our time and provides students with an education that will position them to help change the world. Accredited by the American Bar Association and a charter member of the Association of American Law Schools, the Law School was founded in 1865 and was the first law school in the District of Columbia.

About Better Markets
Better Markets is an independent, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that promotes the public interest in financial reform in the domestic and global capital and commodity markets. Better Markets advocates for transparency, oversight and accountability with the goal of a stronger, safer financial system that is less prone to crisis and failure thereby eliminating or minimizing the need for more taxpayer funded bailouts.
 


-GW-