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GW Experts Available to Discuss Flint Water Crisis and Risk of Lead-Contaminated Water in Other Cities

March 30, 2016
With recent news that Michigan officials ignored the warning signs of the Flint water crisis and the city’s aging infrastructure, it is important to look at water quality in the U.S. and the potential for similar crises. The following George Washington University faculty experts in engineering, education and public health can comment on the range of outcomes and consequences related to lead-contaminated water.
 
To schedule an interview with the experts below, contact Kurie Fitzgerald at kfitzgerald@gwu.edu or 202-994-6461. 
 
GW’s Flash Studio, a state-of-the-art broadcast studio, is available for remote, live or taped television and radio interviews. The studio is operated in partnership with VideoLink.
 
Minorities and Environmental Pollutants
Thomas LaVeist, professor and chair of the department of health policy and management at the Milken Institute School of Public Health, can discuss how minorities living in poor communities are more likely to be exposed to environmental pollutants—including lead. He can also talk about how minorities are more likely to suffer from health problems as a result of their exposure to environmental toxins.
 
Water Quality/Lead Exposure Risks
Lynn R. Goldman, Michael and Lori Milken Dean of the Milken Institute School of Public Health, can talk about events leading up to the Flint water crisis, the health consequences of exposure to lead and possible solutions.
 
George Gray, professor of environmental and occupational health at the Milken Institute School of Public Health, can talk about the Flint water crisis and the risk of lead-contaminated water in other cities, including the role of government. 
 
Rumana Riffat, professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, can discuss wastewater treatment and reuse. 
 
Danmeng Shuai, assistant professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, can discuss water treatment, environmental chemistry and water sustainability issues. 
 
Early Childhood Intervention 
Jennifer Frey, assistant professor in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development, can discuss how early intervention specialists in Michigan and other cities impacted by lead-contaminated water can prepare for the potential impact on early childhood development. 
 
-GW-